My Wii U has a virus, how do I clean it!?

Good news! Your Wii U is CLEAN.


Let me explain… my website recently received a search query asking how to remove a virus from a Nintendo Wii U. I did some digging and see that people have pretty much been asking questions about Wii U viruses since the system launched. I was able to put the pieces together and figure out what’s going on!


People state that they are receiving messages from Nintendo that their machine is infected. What you have received is a FAKE message. It may have either appeared in your web browser, some thing similar to this image:


just one example of many I could provide

Or it may have been delivered by a system message, like this one:




It’s important to know that both of these messages are fakes. One is a pop up ad on the internet, designed to trick computer users into buying fake antivirus programs, or downloading things which normally would infect a regular computer. These are just advertisements on the websites you are visiting, they are not genuine messages from the system itself. The second, “message type” warning is no different than a chain-letter, or forwarded email. It’s spam! It’s just a person with nothing better to do with their time than send these messages to random “friend codes” and usernames it has encountered in games or seen online. This is a mean spirited prank and nothing more, I promise you.


Think about it, when did you see the “virus” alert? Only when you were in the browser, nowhere else on the machine? That’s just because it loaded a page with a fake “alert” trying to make you think that your computer was infected. Or even if you received a message – do you think that if Nintendo wanted to alert you that your system was infected they would do it via the normal messaging system? Highly unlikely. That would be like your computer’s antivirus not alerting you, just sending you an email. I can even provide some more technical reasoning, below, but before I get to that, why not give you your own way to find peace of mind:


If you’re still convinced that you do have a problem, don’t take my word for it: check out Nintendo’s online support documents. A search for the word “virus” didn’t return a single result – but to ultimately put your mind at ease, you can contact support as well, and ask them about it.


It is generally accepted that there are no viruses on the Wii or Wii U because not enough is known about the Wii and Wii U architecture to exploit it with some kind of virus (in short, “Wii’s can’t run Windows “.exe” files). Even if you visit a web page that would infect your regular computer, it can’t infect the Wii U because they are designed to behave completely differently. While it is true that the same things that allow for homebrew applications to be installed on it, or pirated games downloaded to the old Wii are of course things that could potentially be used for evil, those communities are filled with people trying to help each other, not hurt each other. We should never say it’s completely impossible to get a virus, but it is just completely undocumented. There is no evidence of an actual virus being installed on one of these game consoles – only evidence of a message showing up on people’s screens (and almost only EVER in the Browser). That is not cause enough for concern. So relax and get back to your games!

Will the government notify you that they read your emails? Eventually… maybe.

Recently, my sister, a Bar-certified lawyer in the state of California, asked me a great question with regards to all of the recent talk about email privacy. She noted that the article says that, if these amendments take hold, that the government is supposed to notify you within 3-business days that they had snooped in your email. But she wondered, what constituted notification? This brought several other questions to my mind, so I did some digging. Continue reading “Will the government notify you that they read your emails? Eventually… maybe.”

NuAngel – more than an online handle to me

Strange as it is to say, I don’t know if I’ll ever “not be” NuAngel. As I mentioned a few years ago, I registered NuAngel@hotmail.com as an email address on February 8th, 1999. Now, it’s been another 3 years, making the name “NuAngel” over 16 years old. As I once mentioned, I may have used the name as a nickname on ICQ or a handful of other places before registering at Hotmail. But once it was my Hotmail address, it stuck.


I’ve used the name on every network I could register on. Social networks. Gaming networks. Forums. Comments sections on news sites. It didn’t matter. I have been beaten to the name a few times, sometimes I don’t mind, sometimes I wish I had gotten there sooner. Some people have commented that there is already a NuAngel, inc. in the world. Their trademark was registered before I came up with a handle on the Internet, that is true. But I don’t think I have ever tarnished their brand, and I don’t think there’s much chance of confusing our two purposes. In fact, when the time comes for me to have kids, I wholly intend to purchase an inordinate amount of NuAngel, inc. products!


But today is a milestone. As I mentioned, I began using the name, almost on a whim, in 1999. 16 years ago. I’m currently 30. I’ve literally gone over half of my life as NuAngel. I love this name. I love this identity. I’m proud of my public persona, glad to be a semi-public figure. My F-Level Internet celebrity has rarely been a curse, has really made things enjoyable. And I plan to jump back in to it in the near future. More updates coming later this year, but I have been happy to make this site an archive of my past. Don’t worry, even if another site comes online, content will be mirrored here! NuAngel.net is home.

Amazon.com slaps video game bloggers in the face

According to Amazon.com’s new associates agreement, changes are coming, effective next week, May 15th 2014. The people affected the most? People just like me. If you blog about video games and want to earn a living through advertising, it’s time to look somewhere else. Amazon has slashed their already lowest Fixed Advertising Fee Rates on “Video Game Console Products” from 4% to a meager 1%. Clearly, video game bloggers with successful ad models were a threat to Amazon’s success. (That, to be abundantly clear, was sarcasm).

The painful thing to note is that nothing else has changed in their Fixed Advertising Fee Rates. Associates for all other products don’t see a fee-change, but it seems obvious to me that video game bloggers have been able to make a dent in Amazon.com’s income by successfully alerting people to bargains they want to take advantage of via Amazon.com and linking them to the site. With literally 25% of the incentive compared to before, how many bloggers are going to continue plastering Amazon links on their website? I certainly won’t actively work as hard to embed a couple of referral links into an article anymore, and I hope more bloggers are onboard with me. I currently have a side-bar ad for Amazon, which will be gone with the site’s next re-design.

If there are enough sales happening that Amazon.com wants to cut the amount of money they pay out, that means there must be a lot of successful referral linking. Would you rather pay out that 4%, or simply not have any of those sales? To drop an Amazon.com Associate’s share to 1%, while all other products remain 4% or higher is down right insulting, and I hope to see a new revenue-sharing-savvy online retailer step up to take their place, soon.